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By Sergio Guzmán

The United States continues to be a global superpower. The US for the time being will continue to influence countries all across Latin America. However, recent events have suggested signs of decline. And as the decline grows more evident, how will the region’s political power rebalance? The election of Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) in Mexico, as well as the election of Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil marks a radical departure from the current status quo. What does this mean for Colombia and Latin America at large?

Congratulations to the winners of the first annual Open Americas photography contest! We received high-quality submissions from across the hemisphere, making it difficult to select winners.

Images were judged for their ability to capture the richness of the diverse landscapes and environments of the Americas. The beautiful photos below were taken in Mexico, Brazil, the U.S., Colombia, and the Dominican Republic.

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By Laura Schroeder

The video begins with slow, dramatic music.

The words “Grupo Jaremar” flash against a concrete wall, followed by shots of factory equipment and signage surrounded by lush foliage and zooming cars.

A deep male voice announces in Spanish that Grupo Jaremar, a Central American palm oil conglomerate, delivers high-quality products with the customer in mind.

Then, the stories start.

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Open Americas is accepting submissions for its First Annual Photo Contest, beginning Monday, June 18th at 12 p.m. Eastern Standard Time and ending Monday, July 9 at 10 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. By submitting an official entry, each participant agrees to the rules below and states that he or she is at least 18 years old. 

William ArrochaDr. William Arrocha, Assistant Professor at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, recently shared his expertise and thoughts on compassionate migration, DACA, the upcoming presidential elections in Mexico, and what truly makes us human with Open Americas.

Can you describe your background? How did you become interested in the field of international policy and more specifically in U.S./Mexico relations, migration, and human rights?

I am an eternal migrant, born from immigrant parents in Mexico City, a place where many worlds have met, clashed and thrived for centuries. As someone born within an international and multicultural family, my reason for being will always involve more than one country or place. As the Argentina poet Facundo Cabral once said, “I’m not from here… I’m not from there.”

Being born in Mexico to an American mother and a Mexican father always placed me in the confines of U.S.-Mexico relations. Being raised in a family with parents engaged in the realms of the law, social justice, and human rights, studying in the French system during all my formative years and at my bachelors at the National Autonomous University of Mexico could not have taken me to any other path than that of an internationalist.

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Equipo de Open Americas, Traducido por William Giller

El lunes, 12 de febrero, la Casa Blanca presentó su proyecto de presupuesto para el año fiscal 2019. Este documento no solo propone una drástica reducción de los presupuestos americanos para subvenciones a Latinoamérica, sino que también aumenta los gastos para la defensa y la infraestructura nacional.

Open Americas cree plenamente que cualquier presupuesto refleja los valores políticos y personales de sus creadores. Las mismas firmes ideas sobre el nativismo, militarismo y excepcionalismo estadounidense publicadas en el documento para 2019 están también integradas en las decisiones políticas, las cuales perjudican a los pueblos a lo largo de las Américas.    

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Personnel d’Open Americas, Traduit par William Giller

Lundi, le 12 février, la Maison-Blanche a présenté la proposition de budget pour 2019. Ce document, qui propose une réduction drastique des budgets américains pour l’aide humanitaire en Amérique latine, augmente simultanément les dépenses pour la défense et l’infrastructure nationale.

Open Americas croit fermement que tout budget reflète les valeurs personnelles et politiques de ses créateurs. Les mêmes convictions de nativisme, militarisme et exceptionnalisme américain publiées dans le document pour 2019 sont intégrées dans les décisions politiques qui nuisent aux peuples partout dans les Amériques.