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By Maria Luisa Olavarria

I miss Venezuela. I’ve thought about it every single day since I left in 2013. I wish I could wake up to have a cafecito with my mamá, have an arepa for breakfast and be able to share my dreams and goals with my childhood friends. I daydream about the warmth of its people and its weather. I reminisce over time spent in my family’s home, when we all lived nearby, and my siblings and friends were just a call away. I miss the sense of community and the feeling that I belonged. Painful as it is to accept,  I miss a country that no longer exists.

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By Rosalie Mattiola, Traducido por William Giller

Este documento es un extracto de una tesis redactada en primavera 2017. Véase aquí para poder leer el documento entero y ver las fuentes.

Introducción

Mortalidad

Entre 1997 y 2013, Chile experimentó un cambio en la tasa de mortalidad de enfermedades consideradas “modernas” u “occidentales”, como el cáncer, la diabetes y enfermedades cardiovasculares. En las últimas dos décadas, se ha disparado el número de muertes causadas por enfermedades hipertensivas, arritmias cardíacas, arteriosclerosis, aneurismas y disección aórtica, y por los siguientes tipos de tumores malignos: colon, colon sigmoideo, recto, ano, hígado, páncreas, tráquea, bronquios, pulmón, cabeza y tejidos linfáticos. En los últimos 16 años, se ha duplicado con creces el número de muertes causadas por cáncer de colon, de colon sigmoideo, de recto, de ano, de páncreas, de tráquea, de bronquio, de pulmón y de cabeza. El número de muertes causadas por la hipertensión ascendió de 1.700 en 1997 a 4.574 en 2013. Además, el número de muertes causadas por arritmia cardíaca se ha triplicado con creces durante el mismo periodo (DIES-MINSAL Series Principales causas de muerte tasas según sexo Chile).

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On Monday, February 12, the White House released its budget request for the 2019 fiscal year. The document, which proposes drastically cutting the budgets for U.S. aid to Latin America, simultaneously increases defense and domestic infrastructure spending.

Open Americas firmly believes that any budget reflects the political and personal values of its creators. The very same strong sentiments of nativism, militarism, and U.S. exceptionalism expressed in the FY2019 document are embedded in policy decisions that adversely affect people throughout the Americas.

As it pertains to the relationship that the United States shares with Latin America, President Trump has requested roughly $1.6 billion USD to build 65 miles’ worth of a wall along the Texas-Mexico border and approximately $990 million USD to hire 2,750 new ICE and Border Patrol agents. In the same proposal, the President advocates for a $1.9 billion USD reduction in aid to Latin America, diminishing the United States’ ability to achieve its own regional objectives.

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By Rosalie Mattiola

The following text is an excerpt from a research paper written in spring 2017. To read the full text and to see the sources used, click here

Introduction

Mortality

Between 1997 and 2013, Chile experienced a shift in mortality rates of diseases considered “modern” or “western” like cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The number of deaths caused by malignant tumors of the colon, sigmoid, rectum, anus, liver, pancreas, trachea, bronchus, lung, head, lymphatic tissues, hypertensive disease, cardiac arrhythmias, arteriosclerosis, aneurisms, and aortic dissections have dramatically increased in the last two decades. Within 16 years, the number of deaths from cancer of the colon, sigmoid, rectum, anus, pancreas, trachea, bronchus, lung, and head have more than doubled. Those caused by hypertension jumped from 1,700 in 1997 to 4,574 in 2013. Moreover, the number of deaths from cardiac arrhythmia more than tripled in this time (DIES-MINSAL Series Principales causas de muerte tasas según sexo Chile).

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By Laura Schroeder

From the Zapatista movement in Mexico to the Shining Path’s activities in Peru, the Americas have experienced a great deal of political violence. Government structures have constantly changed and dictatorships have been toppled through force and the taking up of arms across the hemisphere. However, one of the most pervasive and dangerous myths is that systemic change requires violence. Nonviolent struggles to address corruption, environmental degradation, economic and social injustice, and political oppression have been– and continue to be– successful across the Americas. Venezuela, Chile, Argentina, and Brazil have all ousted military regimes through the use of nonviolent resistance.

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Por Blake Burdge, Traducido por William Giller

Argentina

Las relaciones entre los Estados Unidos y Argentina se han mantenido estables bajo el mandato de Trump. Es probable que Trump favorezca al país debido a las estrechas relaciones que tenía con el presidente argentino Mauricio Macri cuando los dos eran empresarios. Trump y Macri se reunieron en la Casa Blanca a finales de abril para dialogar sobre la ciberseguridad bilateral y demostrar un apoyo unido para la restauración de democracia y respeto a derechos humanos en Venezuela.

Los Estados Unidos y Argentina han reforzado relaciones económicas desde la inauguración de Trump. Ambos países han levantado las restricciones sobre varios bienes provenientes del otro país. Los agricultores estadounidenses podrán exportar carne de cerdo a Argentina por primera vez desde 1992, con un mercado potencial de hasta 10 millones de dólares. Lo que es más, el presidente Trump acabó la propuesta que había empezado la administración de Obama para levantar las restricciones sobre limones de Argentina, el cuarto productor de limones más grande del mundo.

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By Laura Schroeder

The 2012 film “Harvest of Empire,” based on the book of the same title by journalist Juan González of Democracy Now, demonstrates how U.S. policy toward Latin America has created political, social, and economic instability in the region. Directed by Peter Getzels and Eduardo López, it discusses the cases of Puerto Rico, Guatemala, Cuba, Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, and El Salvador. It also addresses the United States’ role in the military and corporate interventions that have triggered mass migration to the United States. Five years later, particularly given President Trump’s recent backing of the RAISE Act, the central theme of the documentary is relevant: anti-immigrant sentiments in the United States reflect a woeful ignorance of the structural forces that have caused millions in Latin America to flee their homes.